Mid-summer, 1991. That was when I first witnessed someone flyfishing in my home state of Wisconsin – downstream from the Cty Tk A bridge on the Willow River near the town of Hudson. I returned that next spring with a fly rod in hand to sample this sport for myself . . . and a lifetime of exploring Wisconsin trout streams ensued.

Over the next several years, my brother Joe and I logged more time on the water than most people do in a lifetime. Our pursuit of that most ethereal of fish already had us ranging ever further from our homes near Milwaukee. Milwaukee, although blessed with close proximity to Lake Michigan and several of its tributaries, is extremely lacking in the environs of inland trout. We had a growing library of reference material and were working our way west and north as we read about different rivers, their hatches and their trout. In the west, Grant County with its Big Green River, Castle Rock Creek, Crooked Creek and Blue River. Vernon County with its coulee spring creeks and the West Fork of the Kickapoo. St. Croix County with the Willow, Kinnickinic and Rush Rivers. Moving north we first ventured to Waushara County to visit the Mecan River and the White River – Hex Madness ensued. Further north to the Tomorrow River, the Wolf, the Oconto and the East Branch Eau Claire River. And there were more: Otter Creek, the Trempealeau, Lunch Creek, Black Earth Creek, the Onion, the Pine, the Little Wolf, Flume Creek, Duncan Creek, the Pemebonwon, and the Brule/Menomonee. Not to mention several spring ponds. So much water and so little time. Eventually, our travels lead us to the fabled Bois Brule River: rich history, protected forest, pure waters and awesome trout. Part of this blog will recount past and upcoming experiences from our week-long pilgrimages to this most promised of lands . . .

This blog is intended to share past and present Wisconsin flyfishing experiences including information on locations as well as flies and techniques used . . . and we’ll see where it goes from there. Feel free to add your own experiences through comments.

Cheers,
– Paul